Friday, June 15, 2007

A Hearing Teacher of the Deaf told me that...

A hearing teacher just made an analysis on how her perception had changed. (1:25) quicktime youtube

24 comments:

John Egbert said...

Hi Barb,

Would it be nice if that hearing teacher give that information on YouTube.com to the world?

John

John Lestina --- said...

Long Live ASL!

Oscar the Observer said...

I second JohnABC!

Aslpride said...

I am living proof that total communication has hind my ability to write English very well. My next vlog will be relate to this issue. :)

Jean Boutcher said...

That is bloody true. I hope that more and more hearing teachers will
realise that without ASL, deaf children are four years behind. ASL is deaf children's birthright. I hoped that more deaf children using ASL will join DeafRead for vlogging. That would help hearing
parents and hearing teachers see the difference.

Squ65 said...

Yes! Yes! Good thing the hearing teacher recognized! I know many deny this Same here I learned ASL as I entered Gallaudet. My English writing improved quickly!

I am hoping that teacher will mention this to the Parents of Deaf/HOH children thru here or YOUTUBE. Have you encouraged her to do this? I hope she will!

Diane

Barb DiGi said...

Yes, I have thought about getting her and other hearing teachers to share their perspectives when comparing the academic performances between deaf children with high registered ASL skills and those who have basic sign language skills that differ significantly in literacy.

Deaf socrates trail said...

Well,
Good for hearing teacher saw the difference between Deaf children who have very good ASl have far better in writing and reading that thrill me. Now hearing teacher realize ASL is most effective communicative in many ways of learning because ASL already expose to that Deaf children have very positive compare to Deaf children who wear cohlear implant and lipread always make more difficult for them, sadly, I would like to share with you from 1970 One Deaf guy who graduated from Gallaudet University in 1970 and went to University of Nevada for reserach on chimp how much chimp learn from Deaf or Hearing teacher, as a result the reasarch showed the evidence big difference one chimp under Deaf teacher and taught that chimp and guess what? That chimp knew more than 800 signs and another one chimp under hearing teacher that chimp knew only 300 signs. Number of hearing professional who field in deafness refuse to accept the fact! ASL proves great benefit for most Deaf children in learning writing and reading far better!

Cy said...

After the Caeber training at my school, I discussed about CAEBER belief in keeping speaking and signing seaparate, not to use SimCom, with a deaf teacher who wears hearing aid and speaks - to my surprise she disagreed with CAEBER philosophy and said some deaf children still depend on hearing words. SHE was speaking of the kids who were DELAYED! She failed to make that observation.

I told her that the reason for that is they are USED to hearing spoken words but they don't actually understand the words - they were forced to wear hearing aids their whole lives - always had hearing teachers who used voice. Now they suddenly have deaf teachers who don't speak and complain about absence of sounds - spoken words they don't actually understand. I tried to explain there is a big difference - understanding spoken language and just hearing sounds. I suggested for her to consult with the speech therapist who would better explain whether each of her student could actually hear spoken language. I knew they don't actually understand spoken language because their reading and writing are extremely poor. I checked who they had for teachers before this year and they always had hearing teachers. Just as I expected.

What surprised me is a deaf person would say deaf students do benefit from SimCom. I then asked her why doesn't SHE teach in that fashion? She admitted she doesn't speak that well but is able to speak single words in which she does speak and spell simulatenously thinking the students would be able to make the connection between the fingerspelling and the spoken word.
Barb, we have a long way to go.

Judge said...

Ah, tell me about it.

Closed-minded & Uneducated Hearies, wake up and smell the coffee!!

Doctors should have taken advices from the Deaf people -- Deaf people know it for zillion years and it is not very new thing! Come on!

I have a proof that kids have the ability to learn different languages without any problems!

My kids know how to read & write the Hebrew too because they learned to understand ASL at early ages and be able to write/read english later ages.

Like ABC says, Long Live ASL

LS said...

Hearing's perspective on revolution of ASL in bilingual environment IS very powerful. We need more of her or his comments. The more they speak up the better our future's education shall be.

ASL forever!

... said...

A few years when my good friend's first deaf son was in the early intervention program, most of the kids there have CI with just her and one other as deaf parents.

The staff there secretly admitted to her that her son and this other deaf parents' child are well advanced while most of those with CI are lagging behind. My friend's child was already communicating to a point he can describe in details how his mommy warmed up his milk. Why all the secrecy, so I wonder if it is because the school wants to collect $$ from CI industry, I don't know.

Even the parents of their deaf child with CI acknowledged that. They asked my friend how did she manage to have her deaf child progress the way he did. My friend explained ASL is the primary use of language at home and her child is always exposed to communication and language visually.

I remember years ago when I went to this family's home for New Year Eve. They had a 2 1/2 years old and 1 year old deaf children at the time. Now they have 3. While I was chatting with my friends, this girl, I will call Hannah would approach me and say, "Why do you all talk too much?" I asked her if she loves to play a lot? She said yes and then I explained to her, as adults, instead of playing, we talk.

She goes oh and asked me to join her, which I did. She wants to play a game with her and for me to be a monster. She thinks I don't know how to play the game and proceeded to explain to me in details. When she signed, "behind," I did wonder if she understood the word. Good enough, she thinks I don't know what that word means and she demonstrated to me what hide behind the wall. I laughed so hard and she asked me what's funny. Even I know ASL is a language and am user of it myself, I am still awed by what ASL can do for kids. I wind up being her playmate until it's her bedtime. Before her bedtime, we were in her bedroom and she asked me to pretend to be a teacher. When her father came in and saw us, he said to me, "Oh, she kept you the whole time" and then told her to go to bed. She is a smart aleck when she told her father, "Not now, I am in class and Katherine is teaching." I laughed and told that class is over. This kid is now 13 or so, I think.

deafanimalrow said...

A few years when my good friend's first deaf son was in the early intervention program, most of the kids there have CI with just her and one other as deaf parents.

The staff there secretly admitted to her that her son and this other deaf parents' child are well advanced while most of those with CI are lagging behind. My friend's child was already communicating to a point he can describe in details how his mommy warmed up his milk. Why all the secrecy, so I wonder if it is because the school wants to collect $$ from CI industry, I don't know.

Even the parents of their deaf child with CI acknowledged that. They asked my friend how did she manage to have her deaf child progress the way he did. My friend explained ASL is the primary use of language at home and her child is always exposed to communication and language visually.

I remember years ago when I went to this family's home for New Year Eve. They had a 2 1/2 years old and 1 year old deaf children at the time. Now they have 3. While I was chatting with my friends, this girl, I will call Hannah would approach me and say, "Why do you all talk too much?" I asked her if she loves to play a lot? She said yes and then I explained to her, as adults, instead of playing, we talk.

She goes oh and asked me to join her, which I did. She wants to play a game with her and for me to be a monster. She thinks I don't know how to play the game and proceeded to explain to me in details. When she signed, "behind," I did wonder if she understood the word. Good enough, she thinks I don't know what that word means and she demonstrated to me what hide behind the wall. I laughed so hard and she asked me what's funny. Even I know ASL is a language and am user of it myself, I am still awed by what ASL can do for kids. I wind up being her playmate until it's her bedtime. Before her bedtime, we were in her bedroom and she asked me to pretend to be a teacher. When her father came in and saw us, he said to me, "Oh, she kept you the whole time" and then told her to go to bed. She is a smart aleck when she told her father, "Not now, I am in class and Katherine is teaching." I laughed and told that class is over. This kid is now 13 or so, I think.

Deaf258 said...

Hey, thanks for bringing up that issue, Barb!

I have mixed feelings because I didn't learn ASL until I was 20 years old. When I was a child, I went to mainstreamed school. Being the youngest one, I was ahead of everyone in my class in language and reading skills. It's odd that I am the one who is deaf and all the kids are hearing!

I think it mostly depends on the patience of the parents to instruct and communicate with their d/Deaf child at home. I have noticed more "deaf" students who are oral and wearing either hearing aids or CIs have a problem with communication and language development more than "Deaf" students with ASL. If you study the patterns of the parents closely, you'll notice you can measure the success the student will accomplish in school and in life.

I have seen teachers, school administrators and parents focusing too hard on the deaf students' ability to hear and speak. It is sad they neglected the deaf child's right to a real education he/she needs in order to succeed in life.

And.. Barb, I have been meaning to tell you this for quite some time.. You got the best, gorgeous hair!

Deaf Farmer said...

Hey Barb,

Long Live ASL! same as what JohnABC said.

You know it was already answered a long time ago about Deaf children learning ASL then able to read and write in English better than children learning through oralism. But unfortunately many teachers for the Deaf won't support it and won't change their perception. We need to keep fighting to change the system from now on.

Thanks for bringing it up!

Deaf Advocate said...

Yes, your teacher friend is correct! I notice the history of deaf leaders and their writing skills. Those with strong ASL write better! Those not using ASL tend to use poor English skills. No offense!

It is a fact of matter that has been oppressed for 127 years!

It is time to cut audism and bullshit!

ASL stays forever!

=)

mishkazena said...

We desperately need these teachers to speak out publicly, validating the statements of Deaf people. Hearing people will believe them because they have the proper credentials and are not 'biased'. Unfortunately it seems most hearing people are resistant to what deaf people say because they feel these deaf people are 'too' biased, perhaps 'too militants', thanks to AGB people. That's the wrong attitude, but unfortunately it seems to be true. So if you can get these hearing teachers to speak up, on vlogs, blogs, and professional journals, this would be a big boost on the bi bi approach.

Teri said...

Barb,

Yes, that's a NEW and DIFFERENT stratgey of showing the society ASL is the best language for the deaf.

Hearing teachers who agree with us belongs to the one of the diverse groups in our culture - hearing people getting involved with the deaf or supporting us.

Bravo, Barb for sharing that teacher's perspective! We must involve that group of hearing teachers to help change the system.

Think Different! :)

Great vlog!

edgewilderness said...

I have to admit that my english was very weak until I admitted to Gally... It was really confusing doing ASL simultaneously. I got all mixed up trying to understand how to use ASL at the same time trying to understand how to write English. I believe if we learn ASL first or start at the early stage then it should be fine with confident. Agree anyone? Now, I'm so happy that I am passed that and now I'm feeling good about both of them. (ASL & English)

Jean Boutcher said...

A hearing teacher's spreding the word not only in the American Annals of the Deaf but also on
the Internet is the surest and fastest eyecatching among parents who do research. In the early days, parents listened to no
one but to doctors. Now they
are smarter, googling
electronically.

Carrie said...

As a former (hearing) teacher's aide, I truly saw the effects of advanced ASL vs. CI or parental non-involvement. We had one child whose parents, and extended family, were all hearing but all learned ASL when they found out he was deaf (yes, ALL of them!). As a result, he was just as advanced as any of the children who had generational Deaf parents (who, by the way, were all VERY advanced or at least on grade level).

Most of the elementary teachers in the school followed the Bi-Bi philosophy, so all children received ASL without English spoken until it was specifically necessary (i.e. single words to teach lipreading, hearing, etc).

Now here's the difference: you know how the "sandwich" approach was recommended for CI children in the beginning, but usually wasn't followed? I brought that up to the two-faced administrators about how the ASL department was being taught that the two languages were separate, and that all children were entitled to learn ASL- but the CI children were being forced to ONLY learn English, which they couldn't understand in the first place (one could very easily tell): Anyway, I was REPRIMANDED for not understanding how CI's worked!! Crazy. And, of course, the CI children either didn't understand what they were being taught or were completely unintelligible (and as a result had more behavioral issues).

I completely support the use of ASL as its own language! Good job on this Vlog!

DeafScribe said...

I used to tutor English at Gallaudet, and as someone who reads a lot myself, I got curious about why some prelingually deaf folks have terrible English skills, while others had excellent reading and writing skills.

I was attending honors English classes at the same time I was tutoring, so I was able to quiz both groups - the students who struggled with English, and others who excelled. After plowing through a number of possibilities and explanations, a consistent pattern emerged - every one of the students with good English had stories read to them as children.

Since leaving Gallaudet long ago, I've continued to ask others, and the pattern has held up - reading stories to Deaf children makes a HUGE difference in their English skills later. Why? Maybe it's simply the early exposure to English. Maybe it's that together with the pleasant memory of storytime with their parents. Maybe they're just more comfortable with English because they have positive feelings associated with it.

It seems to me that early exposure to English AND ASL is a powerful combination. ASL develops linguistic ability early, and exposure to English at the same time makes it comfortable and familiar.

Karen Mayes said...

Yes, I did notice it as well. In the late 1980's and early 1990's when I attended NTID, I did notice that the deaf students who attended deaf schools had weaker English skills but stronger ASL skills. REMEMBER, that was before Bi-Bi movement. Now, I am seeing a new generation of deaf students attending deaf schools emerging with stronger English skills, thanks to Bi Bi movement and thanks to a greater parental involvment and the more exposure of hearing teachers to deaf culture and Bi Bi method. Of course, we still have some way to go, but with dedication of both deaf and hearing teachers and a lot of parental involvement, it will happen.

ASL Risen said...

Wow! Barb, thanks for your info to share with us about hearing teacher! I wish that there are more hearing teachers could share us with the facts!

Shawn